Tag Archives: human rights

Misogynist Bingo

The “Game” Women Play Every Day (Now in Handy Game Form)

Here’s a sad and infuriating fact:

Among the women I know, not a day goes by when one or more of them isn’t in some way harassed, threatened, bullied, stalked, badgered, endangered, or even subject to physical abuse or violence at the hands of a (usually, but not always, male) member of our misogynistic culture. Think about that. Literally not a single day. When this stuff happens to women, it’s terrifying, it’s enraging, it’s demoralizing, it’s wrong, and sometimes – often, even – it’s deadly. And nobody who supports feminism needs to be told any of this.

But recently, another angle of why this behavior is so fucking insufferably awful, why it routinely sucks the very life out of women I love and want to protect, has been particularly visible to me. I’m thinking about the rote exhaustion and boredom of dealing with misogynistic behaviors day in and day out. And yes, for any readers who are wondering: it is indeed possible to be simultaneously afraid for your life/safety and bored to actual tears. Welcome to the living nightmare experienced by roughly 50 percent of the human population at least part of the time! Continue reading

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Ideas for Patriotism

Here are some tips for how to love your country, and advocate things that make it functional and whole. Continue reading

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A Lifelong Burden and the Policy That Made It Easier to Bear

Diana, David, & Julia - 1994

Diana, David, & Julia – 1994

On an unseasonably warm day in February, 1989, my life turned upside down.

I was 11 years old. My mother was six months pregnant with twins, and for three days had been having horrible leg cramps, which her doctor had told her was from the babies’ pressing on a nerve. He said it would pass in time and cleared her for normal activity. I went outside that afternoon with my mother – newly approved for light yard work – to clear some soggy leaves from around the hedges that bordered our driveway. It was so warm we wore only light shirts and jeans and could smell the soil and wet leaves as the last spots of snow melted from around the bases of the trees. We agreed it was a great day to be alive.

After we’d been outside for an hour or so, we were surprised to see my father pull up to the house at 3:00. This almost never happened; he was in-house counsel to a software company and rarely left before nightfall. We soon learned the reason: my father had lost his job, a casualty of the sine curve of tech industry growth that shapes his professional life to this day. He had also lost his health insurance. Continue reading

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